Motivational and inspirational writer, Bryan Hutchinson is the author of several books about life with ADHD including the highly acclaimed, best selling "One Boy′s Struggle: A Memoir" and the author of the hilarious eBook that went viral "10 Things I Hate about ADHD"

My personal musing about ADD ADHD part 2

 

If you really examine the traits and characteristics of ADDers you will see that we share many of the traits of the people I mentioned from yesteryear in part 1. Those folks from yesteryear were very active, well trained, but trained in a more complete and direct one on one manner. The standards they had to comply with were very simple and yet highly effective and directed. They had structure, but in a manner suitable to their specific tasks and needs. They also followed their natural inherent traits. You probably would not have seen one of them become successful at running a stock exchange, but then you wouldn’t expect the stock broker to go out and skin a deer or paint the Mona Lisa. The creative side of yesteryear hunters, trappers, cowboys and others was that they worked during the seasons and during downtime they were creative with carving, framing, house building and other such creative things, even daydreaming if they might have been snowed in or something similar, such as waiting for the tide to go down. As children these possible Adder’s were known for playing in the woods, catching fish, climbing trees and jumping in lakes. Some of these folks really needed to hyper focus to stay alert, especially those who were hiding or even fishing, sometimes it was even a necessity of survival. How much of all that is still needed today? Sitting in a classroom or sitting in cubicles would have been simply ridiculous for these folks back 200 years ago. In some areas it’s still necessary and as more countries become developed and more standardized in education we will see more and more people diagnosed with ADD ADHD. That’s what I think.
 
For thousands upon thousands of years these possible ADDers of yesteryear were a necessity. We could not have survived as mankind without them and there was a time when they outnumbered today’s ‘normal’ folk. When you think about it, all the way back to when fire was invented just about everybody probably was an ADDer and the ones who were beginning to become organized and build towns and cities were probably the outcasts.
 
Well, then what about the biological disorder of ADD ADHD? Sceintists have discovered in some research that the actual brains of ADDers are different in size and have other differences. Science has also proven that species which do something constantly over thousands of years develop a certain way so that they can comply with what they do repeatedly. That, to me, explains the differences in brain structure and even chemical differences. Research also shows that ADD ADHD is hereditary. It all makes sense the more I think about it. Parents pass down their traits biologically to their children and thus they are predisposed to become proficient at whatever their parents might have been proficient at. This explains why ADDers are not handicapped in the sense of retardation and on the contrary are usually smart, clever and very instinctive.

When I was a kid I had the most fun when I did things on my own. I was a loner. I would stay in my room and just diddle silently for hours and it did not cause me any discomfort to do so. I felt harmony when I was alone. Even superior, and the better I felt was when I went out into the woods and just explored and climbed trees on my own. I loved it when my father would drop me off to fish. I could watch the bobbing bobber for hours without any complaint or realization that time had passed. Twilight usually indicated that it was time to pack it in and my father would come and collect me. Most of the problems I displayed were when I had to do something I didn’t feel natural at doing. When I was in school I would daydream about exploring or being somewhere else as my alter ego Commander Mart.

Something to think about and consider–?!

~Bryan

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