Motivational and inspirational writer, Bryan Hutchinson is the author of several books about life with ADHD including the highly acclaimed, best selling "One Boy′s Struggle: A Memoir" and the author of the hilarious eBook that went viral "10 Things I Hate about ADHD"

The TRUTH about ADHD BLURTING! Here’s why blurting really gets us in trouble!

When we start thinking about how terrible we have it with ADHD, take a moment to remember that we are human, we do not have to rely on our instincts alone, we can change, modify and improve and sometimes it is not ADHD that holds us back, it is our attitude.

ADHD is not curable, but attitude is, even so, doing something about one’s attitude is hard work. Let’s consider blurting things out; is it the process of blurting that gets one in trouble or what one blurts out?

Whether we realize it or not, what we blurt reveals our attitude and true inner thoughts to the world, or at least to anyone nearby. The basic issue is that blurting is normally just an awkward happenstance, which is sometimes embarrassing and usually uncomfortable, but when we lose friends, jobs and get ourselves in deep trouble because of it, then it’s not the blurting in of itself that is causing problems, it’s what is being said. What we say is controlled by what we are thinking and what our attitude currently is. Knowing, understanding and admitting this can change one’s life, I know from experience.

Can you imagine someone with a cheerful attitude getting in a lot of trouble blurting things like “Happy!”, “Roses!” and “Great day!” Probably not, – but why not? Because even though it might be weird and peculiar, and may even raise an eyebrow, it’s not hurtful, mean or degrading or otherwise overly negative. Now, if someone blurts out obscenities or that they hate someone or say something otherwise degrading or disrespectful or just plain mean, then it becomes what was blurted out and guess what: that part is curable even if one never stops blurting. What we say is not ADHD, wreaking havoc with our professional and personal lives, even though the blurting part is!

Think about the last time you got in trouble for blurting, I mean serious trouble, not just because it was an interruption or embarrassing. What was it that you said? Think about it for a moment. Once the cat is out of the bag, saying we have ADHD cannot save us and quite frankly, it shouldn’t.

Even if we never control our blurting, can we change our attitude, our perspective and disposition and hence, what we say? Yes, of course we can, even if we have ADHD! That’s also why what we say can get us in so much trouble.

It is not always the ADHD symptoms that get us in hot water; it’s what those symptoms sometimes reveal about our thoughts, beliefs and overall personal points of view. We, as ADDers, have built in truth detectors via our ADHD symptoms, and we can’t completely turn off the blurting, but we do have the power to change what is being said when we blurt. Sometimes we don’t realize this, because we are so focused on the ADHD symptoms that we do not actually realize what is within our personal control. When we change, improve and modify our attitude, so too do we change, improve and modify what we blurt. If we are not thinking it, then we won’t blurt it! Plain and simple. Easy? I didn’t say that.

Of course, normal people don’t have this problem. Right? Perhaps not to the extent we do, of course not, but attitude always shines through from everyone in one way or another, it just so happens that ours can be more obvious when we blurt it out.

If someone blurts that they hate you, are you going to want to be around them, keep them on as an assistant or otherwise be friends with them? If someone blurts out that they think you are awesome, are you going to want to be around them, keep them on as an assistant or otherwise be friends with them? Both examples may be unique, but both examples show that sometimes it is not the act of blurting that is the problem.

ADHD is not a thoughts, moral or attitude based disorder! It’s a behavioral disorder and there is a difference.

This post is not to say ADHD doesn’t cause us serious life challenges, because it clearly does, especially with blurting, but sometimes, yes, sometimes, we get mixed up on what is an ADHD problem and what is not.

~Bryan

Denise July 13, 2011 at 4:44 pm

wow, did this resonate with me! My 14 year old daughter with ADHD blurts negative things all the time and I get hung up on the ability to control those blurts, but it’s the negative stuff that needs adjustments, not the blurting!!!
I tell you if I had a nickel every time I said
“If you don’t have anything nice to say, then don’t say anything”! Really, you are saying the attitude is there, the adjustment is in the thoughts, attitudes and lens she is looking through that makes the blurts negative.
thanks!!!

Bryan Hutchinson July 14, 2011 at 4:07 am

You’re welcome Denise, just keep in mind that negative thoughts originate from somewhere, for some reason and it is important to find the reason and find a way to fix it together. Negativity, anger and emotions, feelings of resentment etc do not resolve just by knowing they exist, they need care, sometimes professional care. Good luck, I am sure she is a good girl and has her reasons and if she has ADHD be sure that her doctor has done testing for any co-morbid issues, such as bi-polar etc. Not to scare you, but it is important to have the testing, especially when mood is of concern. Mood swings are common with us ADDers as well. I believe in professional therapy, even when medication is working.

Bests,

Bryan

Tina July 14, 2011 at 7:59 pm

8O Wow! This makes so much sense to me. I had know idea
my blurting out stuff was even part of my ADHD. Thanks for opening my eyes to what I can do to stop the negative
blurting I have been doing. This article has helped me out a lot!!!!

Kathleen Christensen July 13, 2011 at 7:21 pm

So true. The deeper work (on things like attitude and mood)can help so much more in the long run than just trying to keep your mouth shut. I do think that work can be particular challenging for those of us with ADD, though, since we often have difficulty regulating our moods (goes along with the other executive-functioning issues, as I understand it).

Although I’m plenty chatty much of the time, I also have a history of being quiet in a group, to the point of sort of disappearing at times. Sometimes I’ve wondered if I started doing this out of fear of my own blurting.

Thanks for an interesting post!

Kathleen Christensen July 13, 2011 at 7:21 pm

So true. The deeper work (on things like attitude and mood)can help so much more in the long run than just trying to keep your mouth shut. I do think that work can be particular challenging for those of us with ADD, though, since we often have difficulty regulating our moods (goes along with the other executive-functioning issues, as I understand it).

Although I’m plenty chatty much of the time, I also have a history of being quiet in a group, to the point of sort of disappearing at times. Sometimes I’ve wondered if I started doing this out of fear of my own blurting.

Thanks for an interesting post!

Rebecca July 14, 2011 at 4:20 am

I was smiling a BIG smile at this! :mrgreen: BLURTING is something I do quite well–although I do control it. I have a harder time controlling it when I am angry. I think I am going to start using ROSES or Happy Day from now on instead of some “other” words. :)

By the way–I am not sure if I would want a cure to my AWESOME ADHD. I LOVE my ADHD and it has made me who I am. :lol:

Bryan Hutchinson July 14, 2011 at 4:48 am

Oh, I think we all have more difficulty when we are angry :) just imagine being angry all the time, which would equal being unemployed, partnerless, friendless and basically alone :cry:

Loved reading that you see your ADHD as AWESOME! I mean really, we can’t get rid of it, so the next best choice is to find ways to love it, which is really loving yourself!! That’s what is really AWESOME!

Bryan

Rebecca July 14, 2011 at 4:20 am

I was smiling a BIG smile at this! :mrgreen: BLURTING is something I do quite well–although I do control it. I have a harder time controlling it when I am angry. I think I am going to start using ROSES or Happy Day from now on instead of some “other” words. :)

By the way–I am not sure if I would want a cure to my AWESOME ADHD. I LOVE my ADHD and it has made me who I am. :lol:

Bryan Hutchinson July 14, 2011 at 4:48 am

Oh, I think we all have more difficulty when we are angry :) just imagine being angry all the time, which would equal being unemployed, partnerless, friendless and basically alone :cry:

Loved reading that you see your ADHD as AWESOME! I mean really, we can’t get rid of it, so the next best choice is to find ways to love it, which is really loving yourself!! That’s what is really AWESOME!

Bryan

Bryan Hutchinson July 14, 2011 at 4:29 am

That’s a good point Kethleen! Still, attitude is something we can all work on and is far more improvable than ADHD symptoms, but I think many find that when one’s attitude is improve it becomes easier to manage and cope with ADHD symptoms. Forcing ourselves to keep our mouth shut is the choice many of us try to make, but when it slips it is usually a whopper! And getting away with those whoppers is usually out of the question. Many blame their ADHD in such situations without questioning their thoughts and why someone would be upset about what they said. They chastise themselves repeatedly about the blurting hoping that will eventually get them to stop, when really it’s what was said that was the destruction causer and not the blurting itself. Still, there are certain situations when blurting anything is not a good idea, but at least we can work to simply make those blurts awkward and not destructive :)

Bryan

Bryan Hutchinson July 14, 2011 at 4:29 am

That’s a good point Kethleen! Still, attitude is something we can all work on and is far more improvable than ADHD symptoms, but I think many find that when one’s attitude is improve it becomes easier to manage and cope with ADHD symptoms. Forcing ourselves to keep our mouth shut is the choice many of us try to make, but when it slips it is usually a whopper! And getting away with those whoppers is usually out of the question. Many blame their ADHD in such situations without questioning their thoughts and why someone would be upset about what they said. They chastise themselves repeatedly about the blurting hoping that will eventually get them to stop, when really it’s what was said that was the destruction causer and not the blurting itself. Still, there are certain situations when blurting anything is not a good idea, but at least we can work to simply make those blurts awkward and not destructive :)

Bryan

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie July 15, 2011 at 4:15 am

Great post! Just got my i-net back (long, crazy story beginning with missing bank card, account freeze for protection, etc.) – playing catch-up as fast as I can!! Your title caught my eye, so I jumped over to read it (anything but work, right? ;) )

I think you nailed it on this one.

What I would like to add is that, even with a GREAT attitude, an ADDer can still get themselves in a ton of hot water with blurting, simply because they don’t worry about their words since “the spirit is pure,” so to speak. In my experience it generally happens most with those closest, at times when one is so comfortable and secure in the relationship that cognitive filters take a hike.

More than a few of my totally positive friends and colleagues have said the most outrageous things to me and around me, never aware of how it came out because their “come-from” was (and is) so totally positive and supportive it never occurred to them that anyone could ever take it any way but how it started out pre-blurt. (I knew what they meant, btw, and found it funny — but that’s NOT what they said!)

I frequently catch myself at the back end of the same dynamic. It’s like my comment hangs in the air and echoes back oddly, or something. I can’t really explain it, but the first time I become aware that I just did it again is when I hear what came out of my mouth that was not at all what I meant to say, what I secretly believe, or anything else but a bizarre ADD thing. I frequently dig myself in deeper trying to explain what I was trying to say, even though the words that came out of my mouth initially might have sounded harsh or judgmental or catty (or whatever). Then I don’t know when to *stop* explaining, which hits my ear as trying to rewrite history (theirs too, at times): “methinks thou dost protest too much!”

I am truly one of the kindest people I know, so I don’t feel like I have to be careful to make sure I’m not cruel, for example. I would *never* intentionally say anything hurtful. But words come out of my mouth that sound like something else, and I have to start course correcting (sometimes seen as “back pedaling”) as soon as I hear them — *IF* I hear them.

After working with her therapist about something I supposedly said YEARS earlier, my sister once ranted at me for a very long evening. Huh? I don’t remember saying anything of the sort, I didn’t think it at the time I supposedly said it, didn’t think it at the time of the rant — it didn’t even sound like me. All I could do at that point was apologize profusely, but I will never know if it was really a blurt on my part, a negative perceptual filter on hers, or a little bit of both. I walked on eggshells around her for years after that.

We worked things out later in life, thank God, and became good friends before her death, but she had resented me for all those pre-rant years for something I had no idea had sounded to her the way it did.

Fortunately, that kind of thing doesn’t happen often. My close friends rib me about it whenever it does – they know me. 8) But BOY does it rattle me to my core whenever it happens! (and no, it’s not a Freudian slip — it’s an artifact of a verbal processor with ADD, pure and simple!)
xx,
mgh – Madelyn Griffith-Haynie (also blogging at ADDandSoMuchMore - dot com!)

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie July 15, 2011 at 4:15 am

Great post! Just got my i-net back (long, crazy story beginning with missing bank card, account freeze for protection, etc.) – playing catch-up as fast as I can!! Your title caught my eye, so I jumped over to read it (anything but work, right? ;) )

I think you nailed it on this one.

What I would like to add is that, even with a GREAT attitude, an ADDer can still get themselves in a ton of hot water with blurting, simply because they don’t worry about their words since “the spirit is pure,” so to speak. In my experience it generally happens most with those closest, at times when one is so comfortable and secure in the relationship that cognitive filters take a hike.

More than a few of my totally positive friends and colleagues have said the most outrageous things to me and around me, never aware of how it came out because their “come-from” was (and is) so totally positive and supportive it never occurred to them that anyone could ever take it any way but how it started out pre-blurt. (I knew what they meant, btw, and found it funny — but that’s NOT what they said!)

I frequently catch myself at the back end of the same dynamic. It’s like my comment hangs in the air and echoes back oddly, or something. I can’t really explain it, but the first time I become aware that I just did it again is when I hear what came out of my mouth that was not at all what I meant to say, what I secretly believe, or anything else but a bizarre ADD thing. I frequently dig myself in deeper trying to explain what I was trying to say, even though the words that came out of my mouth initially might have sounded harsh or judgmental or catty (or whatever). Then I don’t know when to *stop* explaining, which hits my ear as trying to rewrite history (theirs too, at times): “methinks thou dost protest too much!”

I am truly one of the kindest people I know, so I don’t feel like I have to be careful to make sure I’m not cruel, for example. I would *never* intentionally say anything hurtful. But words come out of my mouth that sound like something else, and I have to start course correcting (sometimes seen as “back pedaling”) as soon as I hear them — *IF* I hear them.

After working with her therapist about something I supposedly said YEARS earlier, my sister once ranted at me for a very long evening. Huh? I don’t remember saying anything of the sort, I didn’t think it at the time I supposedly said it, didn’t think it at the time of the rant — it didn’t even sound like me. All I could do at that point was apologize profusely, but I will never know if it was really a blurt on my part, a negative perceptual filter on hers, or a little bit of both. I walked on eggshells around her for years after that.

We worked things out later in life, thank God, and became good friends before her death, but she had resented me for all those pre-rant years for something I had no idea had sounded to her the way it did.

Fortunately, that kind of thing doesn’t happen often. My close friends rib me about it whenever it does – they know me. 8) But BOY does it rattle me to my core whenever it happens! (and no, it’s not a Freudian slip — it’s an artifact of a verbal processor with ADD, pure and simple!)
xx,
mgh – Madelyn Griffith-Haynie (also blogging at ADDandSoMuchMore - dot com!)

ginnie July 21, 2011 at 4:11 pm

Bryan,

There are times when it can be our attitude showing thru in a blurt but that’s not always, or even necessarily often the case.

In my experience when I’m asked a question where the other person is looking for feedback and I can’t for the life of me think of something appropriate I can do one of two things, be silent and say, I don’t know, which will usually start a badgering, or I will as kindly as possible blurt.

Do people’s feelings get hurt? Yes. Sometimes interaction requires a more or less immediate response or you’re being rude. That delay can seem odd and cause it’s own problems. There are times when I turn something in my head around for DAYS before I can come up with something that would have been the ‘right’ thing to say.

Also, I’m often caught off guard that people might find something I said offensive, I didn’t say it with a bad attitude but rather I failed to use the softening words where I’d say exactly the same thing but it would come out less blunt.

If I’ve hurt someone’s feelings I’m all over apologising and reassuring them that wasn’t what I meant. But I’m also accepting that in good part this is caused by my symptoms and not by negativity.

I have never set out to hurt anyone intentionally and it has happened. Sometimes, I think we get so involved in pathologizing/shaming everything, that we don’t realise that with people who do know we have adhd, and are close to us, they can expect an apology and a heart felt one but they can’t expect adhd to conveniently disappear. That’s setting the bar too high and assures failure.

ginnie July 21, 2011 at 4:11 pm

Bryan,

There are times when it can be our attitude showing thru in a blurt but that’s not always, or even necessarily often the case.

In my experience when I’m asked a question where the other person is looking for feedback and I can’t for the life of me think of something appropriate I can do one of two things, be silent and say, I don’t know, which will usually start a badgering, or I will as kindly as possible blurt.

Do people’s feelings get hurt? Yes. Sometimes interaction requires a more or less immediate response or you’re being rude. That delay can seem odd and cause it’s own problems. There are times when I turn something in my head around for DAYS before I can come up with something that would have been the ‘right’ thing to say.

Also, I’m often caught off guard that people might find something I said offensive, I didn’t say it with a bad attitude but rather I failed to use the softening words where I’d say exactly the same thing but it would come out less blunt.

If I’ve hurt someone’s feelings I’m all over apologising and reassuring them that wasn’t what I meant. But I’m also accepting that in good part this is caused by my symptoms and not by negativity.

I have never set out to hurt anyone intentionally and it has happened. Sometimes, I think we get so involved in pathologizing/shaming everything, that we don’t realise that with people who do know we have adhd, and are close to us, they can expect an apology and a heart felt one but they can’t expect adhd to conveniently disappear. That’s setting the bar too high and assures failure.

Bryan Hutchinson July 21, 2011 at 5:40 pm

Ginnie, I totally agree, pretty much what I mean by awkward, even odd and may sometimes come across as rude, but not necessarily mean, or with obscenities. It is possible to hurt other people’s feelings without meaning to and without being mean about it, just not appropriate maybe and worse, even rude, but not with foul language, because that would be attitude shining through.

Great comment, thank you!

Bryan

Bryan Hutchinson July 21, 2011 at 5:40 pm

Ginnie, I totally agree, pretty much what I mean by awkward, even odd and may sometimes come across as rude, but not necessarily mean, or with obscenities. It is possible to hurt other people’s feelings without meaning to and without being mean about it, just not appropriate maybe and worse, even rude, but not with foul language, because that would be attitude shining through.

Great comment, thank you!

Bryan

jennifer newhouse July 22, 2011 at 10:59 pm

Bryan,
Thank you so much for addressing this! Both my son who has adhd and my parents who of course don’t get it at all need to read this. We have been really thinking about the quality of his blurting and the fact that much of it is negative. Especially towards his sister or other people who just tick him off in general.
His sister has a motor disability and bi-polar so Wyatt deals with some really unusual stuff in his daily walk at home. He has had some anger management counseling before but what you have said is really encouraging me to revisit couseling for some deeper anger/greif issues that I think he may be struggling with. I am concerned they may be at the root of his “bad attitude blurting” Do you feel it is common with add’ers to feel like the whole world is against them, (in perception rather than reality?)
Jen

Bryan Hutchinson July 23, 2011 at 9:32 pm

Hi Jen,

Just remember this is a post from ‘opinion’, with that said, yes please do continue to seek therapy, you never know what he could be thinking, believing or why he is acting out, so professional help is always advised.

Now, for the other part of your comment, please know that it is not only in perception per se, but yes, in reality, because ADHD is so difficult to cope with, especially at a young age. Kids with ADHD are still expected to keep up and do things as normal kids would and they just can’t, they need to do ‘things’ differently, they learn differently and they behave differently. Therefore, yes it can truly seem like the whole world is against you because almost everything a child with ADHD does can be ‘wrong’ and needs to be ‘improved’ and why can’t they just do it (which is also an internal question). So it is understandable that he may be upset, overwhelmed and understandably, with everything else, getting rather angry with it all. But, as I often say to such caring parents, he is lucky to have you. Help him the best you can in finding help and discovering ways that he can do things with the mind that he has.

Bests to you and your family,

Bryan

jennifer newhouse July 22, 2011 at 10:59 pm

Bryan,
Thank you so much for addressing this! Both my son who has adhd and my parents who of course don’t get it at all need to read this. We have been really thinking about the quality of his blurting and the fact that much of it is negative. Especially towards his sister or other people who just tick him off in general.
His sister has a motor disability and bi-polar so Wyatt deals with some really unusual stuff in his daily walk at home. He has had some anger management counseling before but what you have said is really encouraging me to revisit couseling for some deeper anger/greif issues that I think he may be struggling with. I am concerned they may be at the root of his “bad attitude blurting” Do you feel it is common with add’ers to feel like the whole world is against them, (in perception rather than reality?)
Jen

Bryan Hutchinson July 23, 2011 at 9:32 pm

Hi Jen,

Just remember this is a post from ‘opinion’, with that said, yes please do continue to seek therapy, you never know what he could be thinking, believing or why he is acting out, so professional help is always advised.

Now, for the other part of your comment, please know that it is not only in perception per se, but yes, in reality, because ADHD is so difficult to cope with, especially at a young age. Kids with ADHD are still expected to keep up and do things as normal kids would and they just can’t, they need to do ‘things’ differently, they learn differently and they behave differently. Therefore, yes it can truly seem like the whole world is against you because almost everything a child with ADHD does can be ‘wrong’ and needs to be ‘improved’ and why can’t they just do it (which is also an internal question). So it is understandable that he may be upset, overwhelmed and understandably, with everything else, getting rather angry with it all. But, as I often say to such caring parents, he is lucky to have you. Help him the best you can in finding help and discovering ways that he can do things with the mind that he has.

Bests to you and your family,

Bryan

Denise September 18, 2011 at 3:02 pm

Another thing to remember is that blurting out things, often has to do with our short-term memory loss. “If I don’t say it NOW, I’ll forget what I was going to say”. I always have a giggle with this, because I do it all the time, and obviously realize…a second too late! Gotta love being an ADDer!!

Denise September 18, 2011 at 3:02 pm

Another thing to remember is that blurting out things, often has to do with our short-term memory loss. “If I don’t say it NOW, I’ll forget what I was going to say”. I always have a giggle with this, because I do it all the time, and obviously realize…a second too late! Gotta love being an ADDer!!

Bart October 6, 2011 at 7:07 pm

I’m a big blurter as well. It usually comes out so fast I don’t even realise I said it. Usually it has to with hearing BS. My antennae are tuned to that and the blurting part of my lovely brain is always able and willing to kick in.
Same goes for people who ask for an opinion. Do you like my new couch? No, I don’t.

I have enormous trouble getting my head around the fact that people are not really asking what I think about their ugly couch, but they want to be confirmed in their choice.

After the visit to the new couch my wife has to explain to me that what I said was not what they wanted to hear.

The time I went to see a newborn baby was a little more embarrassing. But I did say what I thought didn’t I?

Bart October 6, 2011 at 7:07 pm

I’m a big blurter as well. It usually comes out so fast I don’t even realise I said it. Usually it has to with hearing BS. My antennae are tuned to that and the blurting part of my lovely brain is always able and willing to kick in.
Same goes for people who ask for an opinion. Do you like my new couch? No, I don’t.

I have enormous trouble getting my head around the fact that people are not really asking what I think about their ugly couch, but they want to be confirmed in their choice.

After the visit to the new couch my wife has to explain to me that what I said was not what they wanted to hear.

The time I went to see a newborn baby was a little more embarrassing. But I did say what I thought didn’t I?

Angela January 10, 2012 at 4:39 pm

Kathleen’s post really made me think. I used to be really quiet to the point people would remark over it. I was painfully shy as child. Oddly my response as I grew older was to start talking more and unfortunately that came in the form of blurting out very bad dry humor that no one else got and being overly blunt. Got me in a lot of trouble, lost a lot of friends. I do have a lot of negativity, so did my mother who also had no friends. Despite not wanting to be like her I think in some ways I am and want to be better. How can I shut up without being too quiet? Part of my problem stems, I think, from being too smart for my own good and I get annoyed if people say anything I know is inaccurate. I’ve turned into a recluse and fear face to face interaction anymore. Help!

Angela January 10, 2012 at 4:39 pm

Kathleen’s post really made me think. I used to be really quiet to the point people would remark over it. I was painfully shy as child. Oddly my response as I grew older was to start talking more and unfortunately that came in the form of blurting out very bad dry humor that no one else got and being overly blunt. Got me in a lot of trouble, lost a lot of friends. I do have a lot of negativity, so did my mother who also had no friends. Despite not wanting to be like her I think in some ways I am and want to be better. How can I shut up without being too quiet? Part of my problem stems, I think, from being too smart for my own good and I get annoyed if people say anything I know is inaccurate. I’ve turned into a recluse and fear face to face interaction anymore. Help!

Bryan Hutchinson July 14, 2011 at 4:07 am

You’re welcome Denise, just keep in mind that negative thoughts originate from somewhere, for some reason and it is important to find the reason and find a way to fix it together. Negativity, anger and emotions, feelings of resentment etc do not resolve just by knowing they exist, they need care, sometimes professional care. Good luck, I am sure she is a good girl and has her reasons and if she has ADHD be sure that her doctor has done testing for any co-morbid issues, such as bi-polar etc. Not to scare you, but it is important to have the testing, especially when mood is of concern. Mood swings are common with us ADDers as well. I believe in professional therapy, even when medication is working.

Bests,

Bryan

Shell July 16, 2013 at 4:51 pm

Hi Bryan,

Just found this post two years later.

It has been a Godsend today.

Thank you for your words and, for everyone that posted, thank you for your honesty.

Just goes to show you that it takes far more than just listening to Hayhouse radio, meditating, thinking positive when my thoughts are running amuck etc. to change the attitude part.

I heard a guy named Davidji this a.m. talk about SODA – stop, observe, detach and awaken to the truth of who we are. I’ll give it a try today.

Thank you again for the brilliant work you do.

Shell

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